Nintendo Breach Leads Roundup

Company Advises Millions in Japan to Reset Passwords
Nintendo Breach Leads Roundup

In this week's breach roundup, Nintendo is urging millions of its Club Nintendo members in Japan to reset their passwords following a breach. Also, insurer Health Net is notifying its Medi-Cal program members that their information may have been exposed as a result of a mailing error.

See Also: Webinar | Passwords: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow? Be Careful What You Wish For.

Nintendo Urges Password Resets Following Breach

Nintendo is urging millions of its Club Nintendo members in Japan to reset their passwords following a breach that affected about 24,000 individuals.

From June 9 to July 4, Nintendo experienced 15.4 million unauthorized log-in attempts, according to a release issued by the company. Of those attempts, 23,926 were successful, Nintendo says.

Compromised information includes names, home addresses, phone numbers, e-mail addresses and other personal information, the release says.

Club Nintendo has approximately 4 million members in Japan, according to The Japan Times.

Mailing Error Affects Health Net Members

Insurer Health Net is notifying 6,700 California Medi-Cal program members that their information may have been exposed as a result of a mailing error.

On May 3, Health Net learned that some identification cards were mailed to members' former addresses, according to a release issued by the company.

The identification cards contained members' names, identification numbers and the names of their primary care physicians, Health Net says.

In March 2011, Health Net notified 1.9 million individuals nationwide that their healthcare and personal information may have been breached as a result of nine server drives missing from a California data center managed by IBM [see: Health Net Breach Affects 1.9 Million].

Student Data Accidentally Shared

An employee at Page High School in Greensboro, N.C., accidentally e-mailed an electronic file containing personal information on about 456 seniors to one student's guardian, the Guilford County Schools system says.

Compromised information includes names, addresses, telephone numbers, course enrollments, grades, district-assigned identification numbers and other information found on student transcripts, GCS said. No Social Security numbers were included.

When the guardian received the information, the individual contacted the employee, who asked the guardian to delete the files and told school officials what happened, school officials say.


About the Author

Jeffrey Roman

Jeffrey Roman

News Writer, ISMG

Roman is the former News Writer for Information Security Media Group. Having worked for multiple publications at The College of New Jersey, including the College's newspaper "The Signal" and alumni magazine, Roman has experience in journalism, copy editing and communications.




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